How to Become an Appraiser

 

1. How do I get started in the appraisal field?
2. What is a character issue?
3. If I have a character issue, how long will I have to wait before my application will be seen by the Board?
4. What happens if the qualifying course I need isn’t offered at the school nearest me for quite a while?
5. How long will it take me to become certified once I become a trainee?
6. What is the progression of “stages” or “ranks” of the appraisal profession?
7. What are the requirements to apply for trainee, certified, general?
8. How do I count experience hours?
9. When I become Certified do I still have to work under a supervisor?
10. When I become a trainee, will the Appraisal Board place me with a supervisor?
11. How do I find a supervisor?
12. When I become a trainee, how much money can I expect to make?
 
 

1. How do I get started in the appraisal field?

Step 1:  You need to take prelicensing classes. You must complete the first 90 classroom hours of education consisting of the following four courses: Basic Appraisal Principles (30 Hours), Basic Appraisal Procedures (30 Hours), the 15-Hour National USPAP Course or its equivalent (15 Hours), and Residential Market Analysis & Highest & Best Use (15 Hours) or General Market Analysis Highest & Best Use (30 Hours).

You should take these courses from Board approved sponsors and you will find the current list of sponsors on this website. To find the list, on our homepage click on the “Education” link and then choose “Qualifying Education.” Note: you need to take these classes in consecutive order and cannot be taken online.

Step 2:  When you have completed your course work, you can download the application and information for filing your application from the Board's website at http://www.ncappraisalboard.org/forms/ApplicationForLicensure.pdf.

Step 3:  Read the booklet in its entirety and completely fill out the application. Send us the finished application, your original course completion certificates, the required criminal background check from Carolina Investigative Research, and the $200 application fee in the form of a certified check, money order, or cashier check.

Step 4:  The Board staff will look to see if you have had a character issue. For those applicants who do not have a character issue, your registered trainee number will be assigned and mailed to you. For those applicants with a character issue, your application must go before the Board for approval. Regardless of the category your application falls into, you will be notified by the Board staff.

Note: Once your trainee number has been assigned to you, you are eligible to begin working as a registered trainee. (back to top)

2. What is a character issue?

Specifically, if you answer “yes” to the character questions in the application. For example, the following are typical character questions.
1) “Have you ever been denied any other professional license of any other type in any state?”
2) “Are there currently any charges pending against you in connection with any professional license in NC or any other state?”
3) “Have you ever been convicted of or pleaded guilty or no contest to any criminal offense in NC or any other state?” . (back to top)

3. If I have a character issue, how long will I have to wait before my application will be seen by the Board?

The Board usually meets six times a year. We try to get applications seen the next time the Board meets but this depends too upon when in the month we are able to compile background information on you. (back to top)

4. What happens if the qualifying course I need isn’t offered at the school nearest me for quite a while?

You will either need to wait for the class to be offered again or make arrangements to travel to a course provider that’s offering it in the near future. Your education must be taken from a Board approved sponsor. (back to top)

5. How long will it take me to become certified once I become a trainee?

That varies from trainee to trainee. It depends on how quickly you work and how many hours per week you work. It takes a minimum of two years. (back to top)


6. What is the progression of “stages” or “ranks” of the appraisal profession?

Step 1: Registered trainee
Step 2: Licensed residential (sometimes referred to as licensed) - NOTE: The Board stopped issuing the licensed residential level as of January 1, 2008.
Step 3: Certified residential (sometimes referred to as certified)
Step 4 : Certified general (sometimes referred to as general). (back to top)

7. What are the requirements to apply for trainee, certified and general?

Registered Trainee

Basic Appraisal Principles 30 Hours
Basic Appraisal Procedures 30 Hours
The 15-Hour National USPAP Course or its equivalent 15 Hours
Residential Market Analysis & Highest & Best Use 15 Hours OR
General Market Analysis & Highest & Best Use 30 Hours
Total Trainee Education Requirements 90 Hours

Certified Residential - the following appraisal prelicensing courses plus an Associate's Degree or its equivalent. *Note: As of January 1, 2015, a Bachelor's Degree will be required.

Basic Appraisal Principles 30 Hours
Basic Appraisal Procedures 30 Hours
The 15-Hour National USPAP Course or its equivalent 15 Hours
Residential Market Analysis & Highest & Best Use 15 Hours
Residential Appraiser Site Valuation and Cost Approach 15 Hours
Residential Sales Comparison and Income Approaches 30 Hours
Residential Report Writing and Case Studies 15 Hours
Statistics, Modeling and Finance 15 Hours
Advanced Residential Applications and Case Studies 15 Hours
Appraisal Subject Matter Electives 20 Hours (May include hours over minimum shown above in other modules)
Total Certified Residential Education 200 Hours

2,500 hours worth of appraisals, and at least 2 years worth of experience.

Certified General - the following appraisal prelicensing courses plus a Bachelor's Degree or its equivalent.

Basic Appraisal Principles 30 Hours
Basic Appraisal Procedures 30 Hours
The 15-Hour National USPAP Course or its equivalent 15 Hours
General Appraiser Market Analysis and Highest and Best Use 30 Hours
Statistics, Modeling and Finance 15 Hours
General Appraiser Sales Comparison Approach 30 Hours
General Appraiser Site Valuation and Cost Approach 30 Hours
General Appraiser Income Approach 60 Hours
General Appraiser Report Writing and Case Studies 30 Hours
Appraisal Subject Matter Electives 30 Hours (May include hours over minimum shown above in other modules)
Total Certified General Education 300 Hours

3,000 hours worth of appraisals, and at least 2 ½ years experience.

UPGRADING A CREDENTIAL

If you are a registered trainee and wish to upgrade to residential certification then you may satisfy the educational requirements for the Certified Residential credential by completing the following additional educational hours:

Residential Appraiser Site Valuation and Cost Approach 15 Hours
Residential Sales Comparison and Income Approaches 30 Hours
Residential Report Writing and Case Studies 15 Hours
Statistics, Modeling and Finance 15 Hours
Advanced Residential Applications and Case Studies 15 Hours
Appraisal Subject Matter Electives 20 Hours
Total 110 Hours

If you are a licensed residential appraiser and wish to upgrade to residential certification then you may satisfy the educational requirements for the Certified Residential credential by completing the following additional educational hours:

Statistics, Modeling and Finance 15 Hours
Advanced Residential Applications and Case Studies 15 Hours
Appraisal Subject Matter Electives 20 Hours
Total 50 Hours

If you are a registered trainee and wish to upgrade to general certification then you may satisfy the
educational requirements for the Certified General credential by completing the following additional
educational hours:

General Appraiser Market Analysis and Highest and Best Use 30 Hours
Statistics, Modeling and Finance 15 Hours
General Appraiser Sales Comparison Approach 30 Hours
General Appraiser Site Valuation and Cost Approach 30 Hours
General Appraiser Income Approach 60 Hours
General Appraiser Report Writing and Case Studies 30 Hours
Appraisal Subject Matter Electives 30 Hours
Total 225 Hours

If you are a licensed residential appraiser and wish to upgrade to general certification then you may satisfy the educational requirements for the Certified General credential by completing the following additional educational hours:

General Appraiser Market Analysis and Highest and Best Use 15 Hours
Statistics, Modeling and Finance 15 Hours
General Appraiser Sales Comparison Approach 15 Hours
General Appraiser Site Valuation and Cost Approach 15 Hours
General Appraiser Income Approach 45 Hours
General Appraiser Report Writing and Case Studies 15 Hours
Appraisal Subject Matter Electives 30 Hours
Total 150 Hours

If you are a certified residential appraiser and wish to upgrade to general certification then you may satisfy the educational requirements for the Certified General credential by completing the following additional educational hours:

General Appraiser Market Analysis and Highest and Best Use 15 Hours
General Appraiser Sales Comparison Approach 15 Hours
General Appraiser Site Valuation and Cost Approach 15 Hours
General Appraiser Income Approach 45 Hours
General Appraiser Report Writing and Case Studies 10 Hours
Total 100 Hours

To see a more detailed chart, on the homepage click on “Application Information” and then “Prelicensing Requirements.” (back to top)

8. How do I count experience hours?

This information is published in our information and application booklet which can be downloaded from the "Forms" section of the Board's website. The following is a brief synopsis of the types of properties you can receive credit for appraising. You must keep track of the actual hours you spend on each appraisal.

Residential Category:

Residential Single-Family/with inspection
Residential Single-Family/Drive-By or Desktop
Residential Single-Family (Mega home – Greater than 5,000 SF)
Residential (1-4 Unit) Vacant Lot
Residential 2-4 Family
Residential Tract (10-50 acres/improved)

General Category:

Land:
Undeveloped tracts, residential multi-family sites, commercial sites, agricultural tracts, industrial sites, land in transition, etc.

Subdivision Analysis:
Residential Multi-Family (5-12 Units):
Apartments, condominiums, town- houses and mobile home parks

Residential Multi-Family (13+ Units):
Apartments, condominiums, town- houses, and mobile home parks

Commercial Single-Tenant:
Office building, retail store, restaurant, service station, bank, day care center, mini-storage, etc.

Commercial Multi-Tenant:
Office building, shopping center, hotel, etc.

Industrial:
Warehouse, manufacturing plant, etc.

Institutional:
Rest home, nursing home, hospital, school, church, government building, etc.

Miscellaneous:
Improved mixed use (residential/Commercial)
Golf courses/recreational facilities
Improved agricultural tracts

NOTE: You may receive credit for appraisals of other types of real property not listed. You must document your work file to substantiate the number of hours spent on an assignment.(back to top)

9. When I become Certified do I still have to work under a supervisor?

No, only registered trainees must work under a supervisor. Once you upgrade to a status above trainee your supervisor should disassociate you. Please understand, you may still work for your supervisor but he/she would only be considered your boss or co-worker and no longer your supervisor. (back to top)

10. When I become a trainee, will the Appraisal Board place me with a supervisor?

No. The Appraisal Board only licenses and regulates the profession. We leave the individual in charge of finding a place of employment.

11. How do I find a supervisor?

That is entirely up to you. One way is to network in your community. Talk to appraisers who are friends of yours and friends of your family’s. See if they will agree to become your supervisor. If you don’t know anyone personally, talk to people you do know and see if they know any appraisers and would personally put in a good word about you with them. Use the yellow pages in your phone directory. Look up “appraisers,” find their business and go introduce yourself. Give them a resume and sell your qualities to them. Be persistent and professional and someone will take an interest in helping you succeed.

12. When I become a trainee, how much money can I expect to make?

That is entirely between you and your supervisor. There isn’t any criteria set by the Board concerning payment. Before you accept a trainee position with a supervisor, this is a point that the two of you will need to discuss. Some trainees work on commission and others may receive a base salary plus commission. The range of money you can expect to make depends on a variety of factors such as where you live, your supervisor, how much the firm charges to do an appraisal, and so forth. (back to top)

 

 

 
 
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